Sunday, July 16, 2017

Locks, Weirs, Paddle Steamers


One hundred years ago, before the roads were much more than cart tracks through the dirt, supplies and people traveled the length of the Murray River by paddle steamer and barge. Due to differing water levels this meant locks and weirs were built.

This is the lock at Robinvale.



Meanwhile the river runs on, serenely beautiful.



And today's tourists enjoy trips on houseboats and paddle steamers as well as more modern water vehicles.


Helenm Woodall

Sunday, July 9, 2017

Following the Murray River


Did you ever watch the TV series "All the Rivers Run"? Or read the book by Nancy Cato on which it was based? The show was a massive success in the 1980s.

It's set on the Murray River, which is the border between Victoria and New South Wales. Back at the time of the movie life there was pretty adventurous and there is still a genuine rivalry between the states. Don't try fishing in the river with a Victorian fishing license. You need a NSW one.

My latest journey is following the river from Albury where it runs into the Hume Dam, all the way back across Victoria and NSW into South Australia.

So here are some pictures of the Hume Dam as I begin this, my latest adventure.




Helen Woodall

Sunday, July 2, 2017

Current American traditions did not exist in historical Europe!!




I’m excited to see American authors writing historical fiction. I love historical fiction but I do like it to be accurate. Or at least come with a warning that it’s a “wallpaper” story not a researched one. I have no problem with authors making up their own world based on a historical period as long as they freely admit it.

Some eras, such as the Regency and Victorian periods, have been intensely researched. Many books are written about them and authors have no excuse for getting any facts wrong. If the author does make a mistake the editor needs to tell the author to fix it before publication.

The example that started this blog was “Supper”. I have just read yet another Regency-set story where the family sat down to supper. NO THEY DID NOT! The evening meal was called “Dinner” whether it was eaten at 5p.m. (in the country) or 9p.m. (in Town). Dinner was a hot meal with several courses. Supper was a light meal, usually cold food, served at balls and the like after midnight, and children never attended such affairs. Even if a country family ate dinner at five, any supper they had would not have involved the children, who would have been sent to the nursery and would most likely be in bed. A country supper would have been at perhaps 9p.m. and it would have been a hot drink, and maybe a small serve of some cold leftovers, or some biscuits (cookies). But more likely they would have simply had a “nightcap”, an alcoholic drink, with no food, before bed.

Another mistake that really annoys me is calling a married woman in a European historical novel, Jane Smith Doe. Using a maiden name as a middle name is a strictly American tradition. If English Jane Smith married John Doe she was Jane Doe. An old family friend, much more familiar with her maiden name might say, “Jane Doe, Jane Smith that was” and people might refer to her as Jane Doe née Smith, but never never never as Jane Smith Doe.

Oh, and as the picture above indicates, there was no such thing as Thanksgiving anywhere except America until very recently indeed.

Historical authors please, do your research!

Helen Woodall
helen.woodall@gmail.com

Sunday, June 25, 2017

How to be derogatory without using naughty words



Someone pointed this blog post out to me. It’s a list of old-fashioned words used to express disbelief in people or what they say.
It should be compulsory reading for people who can’t verbalize two consecutive sentences without swearing. Here are some great new socially acceptable words to add to your vocabulary.

How many do you remember your grandparents using?

Check out: http://www.buzzfeed.com/emmyf/silly-old-timey-words-you-should-start-using-again#.oq4waQn9v


Helen Woodall
helen.woodall@gmail.com

Sunday, June 18, 2017

Historic Kilmore

Kilmore claims the title of Victoria's oldest settled inland town. It boasts many beautiful old buildings.




At the top of a big hill, which caused my electric scooter to blow a fuse, is the Old Jail.

The temporary death of my scooter put a halt to my adventures for a little while, but I'll be off traveling again soon.

Helen





Sunday, June 11, 2017

History and the Beach. My two favorite things together.



Alberton Cemetery. Port Albert was the first port established in Victoria.


And here is Port Albert.

Nearby is Port Welshpool with the longest historical jetty. As you can see it really is looooong.


Here's a close up of how old it is.

Here's the road into Nooramunga Coastal Park. It's more intended for Four Wheel Drive vehicles than 7-metre-long motorhomes.


But here's the proof I not only made it in, but didnt even get bogged.



Have fun
Helen